Independent University Newspaper

Copenhagen Business School

Nima Sophia Tisdall started her first business venture in high school – now she runs a seafood company praised by Barack Obama

Her name means ‘sunshine’ in Nepalese. She created her first start-up when she was just 16 years old. And now Nima Sophia Tisdall is 25 and has just graduated from CBS. Earlier this year her company Blue Lobster was singled out by former president of the United States of America, Barack Obama, as an inspirational innovator. She learned at a young age that earning money isn’t hard – but creating change is.

The president of CBS invites EVERYONE to take part in celebrating love

On Saturday August 17 the annual Copenhagen Pride Parade will take place in the streets of the capital, and this year the president of CBS Nikolaj Malchow-Møller urges students, staff and friends of CBS to wear a rainbow tie and join the celebration under the motto ‘Love Suits Everyone’.

94 students got their grades mixed up: Should students be worried that other grades are flawed?

A typing error was the reason why 94 students out of a class of 104 got their grades mixed up before the summer holiday. Now, some of the affected students are worried that other grades might be flawed too. The Acting Director of the Study Administration at CBS calls the case “unfortunate” and “extraordinary”. He explains why students shouldn’t be worried about their grades being flawed and how typing errors can be avoided.

Five-year collaboration has made sustainability research a permanent feature at CBS

“Five years ago, you wouldn’t see sustainability-related research published in the big, mainstream journals. Now it’s a natural part of them,” explains CBS Professor, Andreas Rasche. With the Director of CBS Sustainability, Jeremy Moon, he reflects on the outcomes of the five-year collaboration between the Velux Endowed Chair in Corporate Sustainability and the Governing Responsible Business World-Class Research Environment that just came to an end.

A new CBS program focusing on consumerism has enrolled a maximum number of students

A new bachelor program kicks off for the first time in August. It’s filled to the max with 90 new students where they’ll learn to provide customer foresight – not with a crystal ball, but by combining methods from anthropology, cultural studies, sociology and communication studies. The program has been developed in close collaboration with the Danish business community.

Is it responsible to fly nearly 90 people to a conference in Boston?

For this year’s Academy of Management conference in Boston, 88 people from CBS have been chosen to participate. This will cost about 300,000 kilograms of CO₂ if everyone goes by plane. The Dean of Research explains that they’ve started to track emissions from flight travel and have found that researchers appear to be skipping conference travel. We talked to one researcher who ditched this year’s AOM conference in order to reduce his carbon footprint.

CBS accepts more bachelor students – but it’s still super hard to get in

Although CBS has increased the number of study placements by six percent this year, and therefore admitted more students, it’s still hard to get accepted to a bachelor’s program. CBS programs have some of Denmark’s highest entry requirements. But the end of the “artificially high” entry requirements is near, argues the Head of the Dean’s Office at CBS.

Ane Halsboe-Jørgensen is the new Danish Minister for Higher Education and Science

The Social Democrats’ former spokesperson for Children and Social Affairs, Ane Halsboe-Jørgensen, takes over the post of Minister for Higher Education and Science after Tommy Ahlers. “Education is undoubtedly Denmark’s most important commodity,” she writes on her website. She’s been a member of parliament since 2011.

“It’s not the music that needs to change, it’s the culture”

The fine arts are having a tough time attracting a younger audience. Lærke Mogensen, President of CBS Culture has an idea why. At Folkemødet, she shared her thoughts and challenged the directors of concert halls and Danish symphony orchestras in a panel debate, which resulted in collaboration on the shaping of DR Koncerthuset’s forthcoming program.

Tourism xenophobia is a thing and you might have it…

Just like a fear of heights, people can have a fear of unfamiliar food and culture, also known as xenophobia. But do xenophobes even travel? Two tourism researchers from CBS investigated this question for the first time ever. And the surprising answer is yes. But they do it in a specific way! And a lot of us might have a slight tendency to suffer from tourism xenophobia, as the researchers call it.

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