Independent University Newspaper

Copenhagen Business School

The first step towards fighting climate change is: Recognition

Before we can act on the effects of climate change, we need to recognize them first, argues meteorologist Jesper Theilgaard. He’s been invited to CBS on February 14 by a group of students to talk about how we can help the climate in our day-to-day lives. Students can also get inspiration and input on how to tackle the issue through a series of five workshops.

Tommy Ahlers wants universities to create large companies. Ambitious? Yes! Realistic? Maybe

In ten years’ time, the Danish universities should have created ten companies - each with a total turnover of DKK 1 billion. This is the ambition of the Danish Minister for Higher Education and Science, Tommy Ahlers. The Dean of Research at CBS, a professor, and the CEO of Copenhagen School of Entrepreneurship approve of this ambition, otherwise this precious knowledge risks being filed away out of sight.

First report on sexual harassment among students at CBS calls for further action

For the first time ever, CBS has investigated sexual harassment in the study environment. A total of 429 out of 22,000 students replied to the survey, which concludes that 41% have experienced sexual harassment, and 82% don’t know where to get help at CBS. Co-author of the report and Professor at CBS, Sara Louise Muhr says that the results are alarming, and the report calls for further action from all sides within CBS.

State of tech: Will China take over the world in 2019?

Data leaks, the spread of fake news and China’s growing tech influence await us in 2019! That’s what CBS Professor MSO Mikkel Flyverbom, Editor-in-Chief Lisbeth Knudsen and Denmark’s tech ambassador, Casper Klynge predict. Students, researchers and digital competences are part of the solution to the challenges because they can help us ask the right questions.

Are we all con artists?

The disclosure of several cases of white-collar crime worth millions and billions of Danish kroner marked 2018 as the year of fraud and greed. But what makes us commit large-scale fraud, or fiddle our income tax? CBS WIRE asked two researchers who say that it’s a basic human phenomenon that is unlikely to go away.

CBS Library invites ‘formalized chatter’ with cool CBS researchers

The newly established CBS Library Forum breaks away from the idea that you have to be quiet as a mouse at the library. Once or twice a month, CBS researchers will share their knowledge about their latest research, or whatever they find particularly interesting, and discuss it with the likes of you and me.

Denmark’s universities ask Margrethe Vestager to add scientific journals to her hit list

A handful of scientific journals have created a monopoly-like situation, forcing universities and researchers to pay a higher price for having their research published. Now, 800 European universities, led by Denmark’s eight universities and Universities Denmark, ask the European Commissioner for Competition, Margrethe Vestager, to put a stop to the monopoly. The Dean of Research at CBS, Søren Hvidkjær thinks it’s important that Margrethe Vestager takes up the case.

Here they are! CBS’ three new research platforms

Transformations, diversity and difference, and inequality are the themes that will bring researchers together from across CBS and all over the world in three new 'business in society' platforms. Their aim is to carry out research that will be useful for everyone.

How Twitter made Simon’s BA project the talk of the town

“It was like getting a virtual high five,” says Simon Carøe Aarestrup about Nobel Prize winner Richard Thaler tweeting about the bachelor project that he and his fellow classmate, Frederik had worked on. But how does research communication work on social media in general? CBS WIRE talked to two professors about how they use social media.

Excited, gentle, hoarse, sarcastic: This is the sound of power

Researchers Anton Grau Larsen, Christoph Ellersgaard and Morten Fischer Sivertsen from CBS have investigated Denmark’s power elite for years. In a new podcast series on Radio24Syv, they explain their research and give listeners the unique opportunity to hear the voices of the most powerful people in Denmark.

An international Mekka for CBS researchers

About 70 researchers and the Senior Management from CBS are joining the prestigious American conference, Academy of Management, which attracts more than 10,000 researchers from all over the world. The University Director explains that attending a conference like AOM is an important way of branding CBS and attracting international researchers.

What can Hollywood movies teach us about business? A whole lot

Citizen Kane, Wall Street, and The Big Short can tell us a lot about businesses through good and bad times, according to CBS Professor Per H. Hansen. He has watched more than 81 business movies as part of a new research project and points out that movies are as important as annual accounts from big companies.

Fake news fighter: Nation sponsored dis-information worries me

The EU Commission has appointed CBS Professor, Ravi Vatrapu, along with four other global experts to advise on a code of practice on how to stop the spreading of fake news and disinformation. Ravi Vatrapu is confident about the future, but nation-state sponsored disinformation on social media worries him.

CBS goes to Bornholm

Folkemødet is a bit like Roskilde Festival. More than 100,000 people – including students and staff from CBS - visit the festival on Bornholm to engage in debates, events, and celebrate democracy. Watch the films and hear what the President of CBS, students, researchers, and staff from CBS got out of Folkemødet.

The sounds of witches

Witch-hunting is part of Denmark’s dark heritage, and it is a story about the silencing of a group of people. Associate Professors from CBS, Ana Maria Munar and Mads Bødker, want to give voices to the witches and tell their stories through sound bites for the coming witch museum in Ribe.

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