Independent University Newspaper
Copenhagen Business School

Independent University Newspaper

Copenhagen Business School

CBS student from Rio de Janeiro: The greatest party in the world

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Go on exchange |   24. Apr 2019

Daiana Contini

Student Reporter / Photographer

Many of you might know how famous and iconic carnival is in Brazil, and in Rio de Janeiro especially.

That’s why I purposely decided to land in Rio at the very beginning of carnival week.

Many people may not know, however, that carnival celebrations start way earlier than the actual carnival. Cariocas (that’s how people from Rio are called) already start partying in February, especially during the rehearsals of the parading bands that perform all over the city during carnival week.

When the official carnival days start, the whole city is full of street events, called blocos, because they literally block some streets to traffic and they fill them with people dancing, drumming bands, and dancers performing samba on long stilts (impressive for sure).

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)
Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)
Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Each bloco is different, depending on which neighborhood it is, who organized it and what kind of music is played. But there’s plenty to choose from.

Carnival week in Rio can almost be compared to the Distortion Festival in Copenhagen, except this is way bigger and instead of electronic music you’ll get live local music and parades.

But like Distortion, all parties happen in the streets and during the daytime. I was in fact surprised when, on my first morning in Rio, terribly jetlagged, I woke up at 6am to see one of my roommates completely decorated in green glitter (I think he was trying to dress as an avocado) ready to hit the blocos.

If you happen to be in Rio during carnival, or you specifically go there to attend carnival, I suggest a few things:

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)
Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Book your accommodation in advance

A week at a hostel or a hotel will be more expensive than a month of regular rent during carnival week, as this is the peak of the high season in Brazil, so make sure you reserve somewhere to stay in advance. Airbnb works great, otherwise Booking and Hostel World are also good places to look.

Check out the street blocos beforehand

There are so many of them that you might feel overwhelmed if you don’t make a little plan ahead of time. There’s always the official website (https://www.blocosderua.com/rio-de-janeiro/) and several Instagram accounts that keep you up to date with the complete schedule. Be aware that the start time is only indicative (like almost anything in Brazil) and prepare to be flexible.

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Dress up (with as little clothing as possible)

It is carnival after all, so that means you’ve got to find a costume. But don’t worry, Brazilians like to show off their bodies as much as they can, and carnival is the perfect moment to do that. So don’t be surprised if you see people dressed up in nothing more than glitter and a swimsuit (sometimes even less than that), but follow the trend if you feel comfortable, it’ll help you blend in. For cheap, funny and very skimpy costumes, head out to Saara Market (right at Uruguaiana Metro) in the center of the city.

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Be aware of your belongings

While attending the street parties, like anywhere else in the world, be aware of your valuable possessions. Don’t keep valuables in your pockets because there’s a high chance somebody will steal them; they’re experts in doing this. Instead, get a fanny pack or something you can tuck inside your clothes. If you plan on drinking more than usual, you might want to consider not bringing any valuables with you except the bare essentials. And remember to backup your phone often; you don’t want to risk losing those holiday pics!

Have fun – it’s the greatest party in the world!

Drink lots of water and use sunscreen

Carnival tends to happen during the hottest days of the year with temperatures rising to over 35°C. So drink plenty of water during the day and during the night too, especially if you’ve been drinking a lot of caipirinhas. Some ocean breaks might help too!

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Check out the Sambadrome parade

You might also want to attend the official carnival parade where the best samba schools of Rio compete in a 10-hour long parade at the Sambadrome, an incredible stadium specifically built for samba parading. Buy tickets in advance online (https://www.carnivalbookers.com/), or directly at the Sambadrome as soon as you arrive in Rio (it’s on the way from the airport to the city). The parade starts at 9pm and goes on until sunrise, so bring snacks and drinks!

Carnival in Bloco das Carmelitas in Santa Teresa neighborhood, Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: Daiana Contini)

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

CBS student from Rio de Janeiro: The greatest party in the worldby

  • camera in the street

    Opinion

    Online teaching and the problems of surveillance

    As online teaching becomes increasingly common, there is a need to talk about issues of data privacy, surveillance, and not least ownership. At present, we are not sure that everybody has fully realized how much individual-level data is collected and stored, nor is there a discussion about when such data collection without clear aims or objectives becomes too much.

  • Gif of the week
  • News

    Self-reflection: “What would I like to do when I graduate and who do I want to be?”

    Self-reflection is part of the new CBS strategy. Three students share their thoughts on what self-reflection means to them, and how to avoid getting lost in your ambitions and goals.

  • a wall with pictures

    Guide

    7 must dos in Copenhagen this fall

    Fall has officially arrived in Copenhagen, and before you go into hibernation, there are plenty of fun fall events and activities to experience and explore in Copenhagen. In this guide, student writer Caroline Sølver lists seven activities that you shouldn’t miss in Copenhagen this fall.

  • illustration with people

    News

    MBA and master’s students from Canada and CBS solve sustainability issues together in cyberspace

    Bringing MBA students from Rotman School of Management in Canada together with master’s students from CBS started as an idea that came to life with the COVID-19 pandemic. In teams online, the students are devising solutions to sustainability issues in Denmark and Canada – for example, how to electrify the bus fleet in Toronto.

  • Illustration of woman in chains

    #MeToo

    “It was a vulnerable moment, I was surrounded by so many people, but I started feeling alone”

    A CBS student tells her story of being harassed at the Semester Start Party last year. She hopes her fellow students will speak up and not close their eyes to sexual harassment. Both for the sake of themselves and others. 

  • I chose to study for an HD at CBS not to get my degree certificate, but for the sole purpose of increasing my economics and business expertise Nicky Andersen, professional dancer and choreographer and CBS student
  • #MeToo

    Sexism in academia: 700 researchers’ stories to become a handbook on sexism

    More than 700 researchers from across the Danish universities have signed a letter against sexism in academia and shared anonymous examples covering everything from rape to degrading and suggestive remarks. Sara Louise Muhr, Professor and co-organizer behind the letter, wants to make a handbook based on the stories.

CBS WIRE collaborates with Videnskab.dk

Stay connected

Close